Yaks are strong, Ox-like animals that are needed for nearly every facet of the Tibetan people's lives. It's used for transportation, clothing, food, and farming. The Yak is highly revered and Tibetans could not survive without the Yak. The Yak Bone beads are used to honor the animals that service humankind and inspire the wearer to likewise serve others. Artisans create the jewelry from Yak Bone and bring it to the monks to receive blessings that are believed to be passed on to the wearer of the bracelet. The bracelets are believed to provide strong protection to the person wearing it.
 
The Tibetan world Dzi means 'brightness, shine, splendor and clarity,' and are referred to as 'heaven's pearls.' The idea behind them is that these "eyes" have absorbed the universe's cosmic energy making them very powerful and able to protect against bad luck, bring good luck and blessings, and improve your fortune, your bliss, and your inner 'qi' levels. These may be just small beads but they bring with them a lot of power for a better life and to be a better person. This powerful eye is believed to enhance human wisdom and bring forth happiness for life. With the Dzi talisman a wearer can remove negative energies around them and be protected from their effect. Try to wear the 'eye' on the inside of your wrist so it rests on your pulse. The first thing to do when you acquire this stone is to hold it in your hand under running water for a few minutes. Water is very important as a spiritual cleansing agent in many Eastern philosophies. Keep positive thoughts in your head as your are doing this. Now, quietly, and sincerely ask the stone to be a part of your life. Ask it to help protect you, and assure is that you will respect and take good care of it.
 
When it comes to the sacred Yak bone jewelry used in their Buddhist traditions, the rules are strict: the animals must die of natural means.
 
 

Yak Bone and Horn, DZI Beads Bracelet

$20.00Price
  • Made with real Yak Bone.

    Adjustable band.

    *Handmade in Nepal by Tibetan refugees